The Outdoor Report

Fishin’ Report

DGIF Fisheries Technician Cliff Kirk holds walleye caught in Southwest Virginia.
DGIF Fisheries Technician Cliff Kirk holds walleye caught in Southwest Virginia.

The Fishin’ Report is put together from recent reports from avid anglers,  fishing guides, marinas and bait shops for major rivers and lakes all across the state. We encourage you to take advantage of the unusually warm sunny days and head out to your favorite river or lake and take a kid fishing. Please use caution when planning any outdoor activities or going on the water. Always wear your life jacket and let someone know where you are going and when you plan to return. Check conditions before you venture out.

Send your fishing photos directly to us at: social@dgif.virginia.gov

 

Tips for Post-Spawn Walleye Fishing

By:  Clifford Kirk, Fisheries Biologist Assistant, Region III

The walleye spawn is over now.  The fish are not as concentrated as they were last month [March] on the spawning grounds, but the good news is they are hungry and will be much more interested in biting.  Walleyes will spread out along the entire lake shoreline, but key habitats will hold more fish.  Remember that walleye are light-sensitive, so shady areas will be better during daylight hours.  At night walleyes will venture in shallow water looking for easy prey.  In lakes that have alewives, night fishing this time of year can be really productive and exciting.  The alewives come into shallow water at night to spawn.  They spawn near the water surface, with small groups of alewives swimming in tight circles.  This spawning activity makes quite a bit of noise and often attracts hungry walleyes.  When a walleye hits a spawning alewife it makes a crack that will startle you.

Shallow running minnow plugs are the best choice for walleyes chasing alewives. Don’t be afraid to use larger plugs that would often be considered “striper lures”.   Topwater lures with small propellers will also work well during the alewife spawn.  One of the best things about this type of fishing is that you don’t have to know the secret spot and you don’t need a fish finder.  You just need to listen for surface activity from the alewives.  When you hear a walleye hitting the surface you will know it.  Cast your plug into the mix and do your best to make it look like an injured alewife trying to swim away.

Virginia lakes that have both alewives and walleye include Claytor Lake, Flannagan Reservoir, Hungry Mother Lake, North Fork of Pound Lake, Philpott Reservoir and South Holston Reservoir.  All of these lakes should offer really good night fishing opportunities for walleye from mid- April through mid-May.

Editor’s Note…   Just after we received this walleye fishing tips article from Cliff,  Bill Kittrell , Fisheries Manager for Region 3 announced that Cliff had passed away after a vaaient fight with cancer.   Cliff began working for the Department in southwest Virginia in 1998 as an hourly employee for the Fisheries Division and was hired full time as a Fisheries Technician in November  2001.  He spent his entire career working out of the Marion Regional Office.  Those of you who knew Cliff will never forget him.  His stories of hunting and fishing, of fish sampling, or just plain rural life in Appalachia, will live in infamy.  He has touched many people throughout his life in a very significant way.  If you didn’t know him well, you really missed knowing a great individual.  If you have never heard of him, ask someone who did to tell you one of Cliff’s famous stories.  He was passionate about his job, was extremely proud to work for DGIF and was a friend to many.  He will be truly missed.  Probably no one spent as much time with Cliff in the field over the years as Tom Hampton, Lands & Facilities Manager for Region 3. Tom remembered Cliff along with the featured picture that makes us all smile of Cliff holding a big walleye, “This is one of the many ways I will remember Cliff.  I hope you will smile when you see this picture.  I am so thankful for the thousands of hours I shared a boat with him.  Cliff loved hunting and fishing as much as anyone I have ever known.  He also loved his job and his coworkers.  Although we are heartbroken for the loss, what a blessing it is to have known Cliff, as a coworker and as a dear, dear friend.”      Cliff’s DGIF friends will host a “Celebration of Life” memorial event at the Marion Regional Office on May 10th beginning at 11:00 a.m.  View obituary at: http://www.bradleysfh.com/home/obituary/clifford-ray-kirk

 

Three Generations of Fishing Fun...  Avid hunter , angler and award winning nature photographer Andy Maneno sent in this great photo of his nephew Maxwell Larry Maneno with his first crappie caught at the family’s “honey hole.” His 1st Crappie was 15.75 inches- a real ‘rod-bender’!   Grandparents,  Larry and Ruth Maneno were along to enjoy the beautiful sunny day and commented , “Not a bad looking Crappie for a 8 year old!”   Grandma advised , “Its all about having a nice fishing hat when you’re fishing with the kids!”

 

 

Virginia Conservation Police Notebook

DGIF 9th Basic and Modified Law Enforcement Academies graduated a total of 32 new Conservation Police Officers in April.   The officers took an oath to serve and protect you and the resources we all use and enjoy, from those who act irresponsibly and break the law.  These highly trained and dedicated men and women have a daunting task to serve in multiple counties and communities.    Remember these officers are there to protect your freedom to enjoy the outdoors — support them in their important work by setting a good example and seeing that others around you do their share to enjoy the outdoors safely and ethically.   If there is a new CPO in your county, get to know them and offer your assistance and knowledge on local contacts and conditions.
DGIF 9th Basic and Modified Law Enforcement Academies graduated a total of 32 new Conservation Police Officers in April. The officers took an oath to serve and protect you and the resources we all use and enjoy, from those who act irresponsibly and break the law. These highly trained and dedicated men and women have a daunting task to serve in multiple counties and communities. Remember these officers are there to protect your freedom to enjoy the outdoors — support them in their important work by setting a good example and seeing that others around you do their share to enjoy the outdoors safely and ethically. If there is a new CPO in your county, get to know them and offer your assistance and knowledge on local contacts and conditions.

To increase awareness of Conservation Police Officers (CPO’s-previously called game wardens) activities, the “Virginia Conservation Police Notebook” provides an overview of activities encountered by our officers who protect natural resources and people pursuing outdoor recreation in the fields, woods and waters of Virginia. These reports are prepared from the officer’s field notes by Kim McCarthy, Executive Assistant to Major Scott Naff [Operations] and Major Bryan Young [Administration] of the Law Enforcement Division of DGIF. These CPO reports show the value of concerned citizens, landowners and true sportsmen in providing tips to law enforcement officers on suspected violations by lawbreakers who give other outdoor enthusiasts an undeserved bad reputation.

Editor’s Note…  Support Your Local CPO…

Don’t let the actions of a few outlaws or unethical outdoorsmen tarnish the reputation of Virginia’s sportsmen and sportswomen!   Safety and courtesy are free, use them generously as you share the outdoors with others.   Last week the DGIF 9th Basic and Modified Law Enforcement Academies graduated a total of 32 new Conservation Police Officers. Twelve of these officers were previously sworn and the remaining 20 completed the full basic training.  The officers took an oath to serve and protect you and the resources we all use and enjoy, from those who act irresponsibly and break the law.  These highly trained and dedicated men and women have a daunting task to serve in multiple counties and communities.   Some newly sworn officers can use your assistance to get oriented to their new assignments.  Remember these officers are there to protect your freedom to enjoy the outdoors — support them in their important work by setting a good example and seeing that others around you do their share to enjoy the outdoors safely and ethically.   If there is a new CPO in your county, get to know them and offer your assistance and knowledge on local contacts and conditions. They are your best partner in preserving and protecting our rich hunting, boating and fishing traditions. Help make all our jobs safer and more successful – support all your area law enforcement officers in any way you can. They are there to benefit you.

David Coffman, Editor The Outdoor Report

Region I – Tidewater

Spotlighting Turns Ugly – Beginning in late September 2016, CPO Greg Hall received several reports of spotlighting in King William County. Several deer had been shot in fields in the area. Two callers reported seeing a large white pickup after hearing shots fired.  Officer Hall began working spotlighting patrol in the area in early November 2016 and continued working the area throughout the hunting season. A landowner observed a truck spotlighting his field in early December 2016. He followed the truck to a road intersection to attempt to make contact with the driver. The landowner was run over by the same truck. He provided a description of the vehicle to the King William Sheriff’s Office, a large white pickup truck with white mirrors. Officer Hall interviewed the landowner and another person who reported seeing a spotlight, from the white truck, during the incident. Officer Hall spoke with several hunters and asked them to obtain license plate numbers of any vehicles they saw matching the description. In early January 2017, a hunter sent Officer Hall a photograph of a truck matching the description. Officer Hall forwarded the information to the King William Sheriff Office investigators. King William Investigators determined this was the truck which had struck the landowner. Officer Hall obtained Arrest Warrants for the four occupants of the truck in January, charging each with Spotlighting. The case was heard in March 2017. The driver’s hunting privileges were revoked for five years.

Hounds for Hero’s –   On Saturday April 8th, CPO Sergeant Valasek and Officer Hennaman attended the 5th annual “Hounds for Hero’s” event in Hanover County.  The event kicks off with a large BBQ feast with the food provided by donations from local companies, followed by a large auction where items are donated from community sponsors.    The highlight of the event is a fox hound field trial inside of Fox Run training preserve.  This event has proven to be a wonderful event and this year raised over $19,000 to be distributed to wounded veterans.

Region II – Southside

Officers Intuition Saves Life – On April 10, 2017, at approximately 12:15 PM, CPO Tyler Blanks and his new Probationary Officer Toby Livermore were on their way to court traveling down Highway 58 in Mecklenburg County.  While crossing Rudd’s Creek, a large body of water that passes underneath Route 58, Officer Blanks looked down at the boat ramp and saw an older gentleman who had launched a crawdad type vessel at the ramp.  Officer Blanks could see from the highway that the vessel didn’t appear to have registration numbers displayed on the hull.  With a little time cushion before court, Blanks and Livermore decided to make a u turn and go check the boater’s status.  Upon making contact with the gentlemen, they discovered that he had just purchased the boat and did in fact have a temporary registration.  The man explained he was just trying the boat out and was planning on going to another lake later that day to actually fish.  Pleasantries were exchanged and the officers departed, but not before the man told Blanks and Livermore he appreciated what they did and that he was going to pray for them.  As the two officers drove out of the area and down Route 58, Officer Blanks felt the urge to look over his shoulder at the ramp one last time before he went out of view.  When he did, he was surprised to see the old man in the water at the end of the boat ramp holding on to the dock.  All Officer Blanks could see was the top of the man’s head.  Officer Blanks and Livermore activated their emergency equipment and sped up to get to a location where they could make a u turn.  They quickly made their way back down to the ramp and ran out to the end of the dock where both Officers helped the man from the water.  The man had fallen off the boat at the dock and his pants had entangled around a wing nut on the trolling motor and he could not free himself.  Luckily the 81 year old man was not injured but he told the officers he was about to give out and that he was certain that Officers Blanks and Livermore had saved his life.  Once the Officers got him to safety they evaluated him and asked him if he needed medical services.  He said he was okay now and that he would be wearing his PFD from here on out.  Officer Blanks and Livermore had to make their way to court but were able to make contact with another boater who had arrived at the ramp.  They explained to the newly arriving boater what had just occurred and asked him if he would keep an eye on the man and help him out if he needed anything while preparing to leave, to which the gentlemen said he absolutely would.

Region III – Southwest

Illegal Elk Case Made – On April 15, 2017, Virginia Conservation Police Officers Joe Early, and Matt Arnold concluded an investigation from December 2016 regarding an illegally killed elk that was shot in Russell County.  Evidence was collected that included pictures of the suspect holding the elk antlers.  After many unsuccessful attempts were made to locate the suspect, he was located and interviewed.  During the interview he admitted that he did have possession of the illegal Elk but that he became suspicious and disposed of the antlers.  The appropriate charges were made.

Region IV – Mountains & Shenandoah Valley and Northern Piedmont

 Fugitive from Justice Fishing without a License, Caught – On Sunday, April 9, 2017, CPO’s Quarles, Hatmaker and Hall were patrolling the river bank along the Rappahannock River on the Stafford / Fredericksburg line.  Officers observed two males fishing on a rock in the river near the riverbank.  The officers approached the individuals fishing and observed hickory shad, cat fish, and other fish that they had caught.  When the officers asked the individuals for their fishing licenses, they stated they did not have them.  While speaking with the fishermen, Officers Quarles and Hatmaker were notified that one of the individuals was a fugitive from justice on full extradition from Massachusetts, for strangulation, that allegedly occurred in 2015.  After confirming the subject’s name and identifying information, Officers Quarles and Hatmaker subsequently arrested the fisherman.  Officers issued summons to both subjects for fishing without a license.  The fugitive from justice was taken before the magistrate where a warrant of extradition was issued.  The fugitive was held without bond in the Rappahannock Regional Jail.

More Musky For Us All

A large female Musky receives an injection to induce labor.
A large female Musky receives an injection to induce labor.

By CWF Volunteer Allen Easterly

As a Complementary Work Force (CWF) Volunteer, I recently had the great pleasure to assist Region 2 and Region 4 Fisheries personnel begin the process of obtaining more Musky for release in Commonwealth waters.  During two separate trips, two teams of three or four, conducted an electro-fishing expedition on a portion of the James River where there is a very high population of Musky.

The huge, toothy fish were netted and brought on board to large live wells. Brought back to the launch ramp, the fish were sexed, weighted, and length measured. The males were immediately placed in a stocking truck loaded with fresh water.  The females were checked for the presence of eggs by the very skilled hands of Fishery folks.  They then mixed powdered carp pituitary gland in sterile water.  Once the powder had fully dissolved, it was injected into an open pocket at the base of the pelvic fins. The purpose of this unusual concoction is to induce labor.  The fish will safely lay its eggs soon after injection in a controlled environment. The females were loaded into a separate compartment of the stocking truck and all fish taken to a nearby hatchery for egg laying and fertilization.  There, once the female lays eggs, the male fish are milked of sperm to fertilize the eggs. The adult fish were then returned to the place they were netted and released unharmed.

Under close monitoring of Fisheries personnel, millions of Musky eggs strive to hatch and survive.  Life is rough in the world of fish eggs and not all will survive even though they are protected from predators.  Of those that do hatch and survive, they will be stocked in other suitable waters throughout the state once they are large enough to fend for themselves.

Being a CWF volunteer, besides being a lot of fun, allows you to be exposed to many fascinating educational experiences you just can’t find anywhere else.  If you’d like to consider joining the fun, learn how to become a volunteer today!

Spring Gobbler Harvest Numbers Trending Higher

Turkey hunters are enjoying great hunting so far this spring. Good weather conditions and stable turkey numbers over most of the Commonwealth have certainly contributed to hunter success this year for both the Youth & Apprentice and the Spring Gobbler opening weekends. A total of 3,047 gobblers were harvested the opening weekend of the 2017 Spring Gobbler season, compared to 2,291 in 2016.

Opening Weekend 2017

  • Saturday, April 8th             2,019
  • Sunday, April 9th               1,028
  • Weekend Total                 3,047

Opening Weekend 2016

  • Saturday, April 9th             1,610
  • Sunday, April 10th                681
  • Weekend Total                 2,291

Harvest numbers for the Youth & Apprentice weekend – Saturday April 1st and Sunday, April 2nd, were also up. Across the state hunters enjoyed seasonal temperatures with almost no rain or significant winds. Youth and Apprentice hunters reported harvesting 624 birds. On Saturday 433 turkeys were reported killed (69% of total w/e harvest) and 191 (31%) on Sunday. The 2017 harvest was 4% higher than 2016, when 598 birds were harvested.

Graves Mountain Lodge Trout Heritage Kids Fishing Day Nets Big Trout

Families enjoyed the sunny skies and fishing action at the annual Graves Mountain Lodge Trout Heritage Kids Fishing Day April 1st on the Rose River in Madison County.  Photo by David Coffman, Editor TOR.
Families enjoyed the sunny skies and fishing action at the annual Graves Mountain Lodge Trout Heritage Kids Fishing Day April 1st on the Rose River in Madison County. Photo by David Coffman, Editor TOR.

The Annual Graves Mountain Lodge Trout Heritage Kids Fishing Day Saturday April 1st was a big success. Fortunately,  the heavy rains on Friday did not affect the water quality Saturday morning in Rose River . The ‘kids only’ fishing area had been specially stocked Friday afternoon and patrolled by a team of CPOs.  Sunny skies and 50-60 degree temperatures made for smiles up and down the banks full of anxious families eager to catch trout.  An estimated 200 youngsters, plus another 200 family members, spread out along the banks of the Rose River wading in the rocky shallows.

The “have fun” attitude of all the participants was just great and it was wonderful to watch the families helping the kids fish, even if they weren’t their own; putting power bait on the hooks,  getting lines patiently untangled, hooks out of caught trout, and getting slippery, fidgety trout on the stringer.  Lots of trout were caught, including a few Citations.  The DGIF exhibit was the highlight of the pavilion [except for the delicious food served by the Graves].  The four Complementary Work Force [CWF] volunteers (John McMann, Jerry Chambers, Bill Taylor, and Bob Stover) and CPO’s gave individual attention to the kids, their parents and mentors on a variety of topics and handed out a lot of educational materials.  With it being opening day of the Youth Spring Turkey Hunting weekend, TOR Editor David Coffman had a variety of turkey calls for the kids to try.  The Red Corn Snake was, as always,  the star of the show- with as many repeat fans as newcomers.  The Rapidan Chapter of Trout Unlimited co-sponsors this event and provides fishing poles, tackle and bait for kids who do not have their own.  The TU members roamed the river bank to lend assistance in catching and caring for trout.   Jimmy and Rachael Graves, along with their family and staff, were gracious hosts for the event and tended to their guests every need to make a successful, fun filled day of fishing and family fun.  Already looking forward to next year!

To find an upcoming Kids Fishing Day event near you visit our website.

Families enjoyed the sunny skies and fishing action at the annual Graves Mountain Lodge Trout Heritage Kids Fishing Day April 1st on the Rose River in Madison County. The event is co-sponsored by the Rapidan Chapter of Trout Unlimited, the Graves family and DGIF. Photo by David Coffman, Editor TOR.

Virginia Conservation Police Notebook

Conservation Police Officers spent a fun day assisting young anglers on the Rose River in Madison County participating in the annual Graves Mountain Lodge Trout Heritage Kids Fishing Day April 1st.  CPO Steve Hicks offers tips to a first time angler on Rose River.  Photo by David Coffman, Editor TOR.
Conservation Police Officers spent a fun day assisting young anglers on the Rose River in Madison County participating in the annual Graves Mountain Lodge Trout Heritage Kids Fishing Day April 1st. CPO Steve Hicks offers tips to a first time angler on Rose River. Photo by David Coffman, Editor TOR.

To increase awareness of Conservation Police Officers (CPO’s-previously called game wardens) activities, the “Virginia Conservation Police Notebook” provides an overview of activities encountered by our officers who protect natural resources and people pursuing outdoor recreation in the fields, woods and waters of Virginia. These reports are prepared from the officer’s field notes by Kim McCarthy, Executive Assistant to Major Scott Naff [Operations] and Major Bryan Young [Administration] of the Law Enforcement Division of DGIF. These CPO reports show the value of concerned citizens, landowners and true sportsmen in providing tips to law enforcement officers on suspected violations by lawbreakers who give other outdoor enthusiasts an undeserved bad reputation. Don’t let the actions of a few outlaws tarnish the reputation of Virginia’s sportsmen!

Region I – Tidewater

On March 30 and 31, 2017, Sr. Conservation Police Officer (CPO) Frank Spuchesi, assisted by CPO Glenn Cramer, conducted All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) training for the King George County Sheriff’s Office. Training courses were provided to both new operators as well as a refresher course that was provided for those deputies who had previously received training by the DGIF. The Sheriff’s Office recognized both CPO’s with a post on their Facebook page.

Region II – Southside

Statement Leads to Arrest – On March 28, 2017, Senior CPO Brandon Harris had just returned to his patrol vehicle from checking anglers at Conner Lake in Halifax County when a vehicle pulled into the parking area.  As Officer Harris spoke to the two occupants of the vehicle, one subject stated that he was only going to watch his companion fish because he did not have a valid fishing license.  Officer Harris bid his companion good luck and drove away from the parking area.  Once out of sight, Brandon concealed his patrol vehicle and returned to the lake on foot to observe the two subjects.  Upon returning, he observed the subject who claimed to be unlicensed walk back to the vehicle and retrieve a fishing pole.  After checking the parking area several times to be sure Officer Harris had left for good, the subject began to fish and even caught one.  Officer Harris approached the two individuals and discovered that the subject indeed did not have a fishing license.  Brandon ran the subject’s information and found that he was also wanted out of the City of Chesapeake.  The subject was arrested without incident and summoned for the fishing license violation.

Trout Heritage Day and Youth Spring Turkey Hunting Day – On April 1, 2017, Trout Heritage Day on the Pigg River in Franklin County was one of the best yet for the hundreds of participants.  The weather was perfect, as was the fishing success.  Blake Ingram, from Boones Mill, [shown in the attached photo] landed a trophy 9lb, 4oz rainbow trout on Saturday morning.  Youth and Apprentice Spring Turkey hunting weekend was also very successful for many first time hunters as well.

Region III – Southwest

Unsafe Driving Leads to Arrest – On March 25, 2017, Senior CPO Daniel Ross was on patrol in Scott County.  Officer Ross was patrolling along the Clinch River when he observed a black Chevrolet pickup traveling west on Route 72.  The pickup was missing a front windshield and was occupied by two individuals wearing safety glasses.  Officer Ross turned on the vehicle that appeared to accelerate to avoid apprehension.  Officer Ross attempted to catch up to the vehicle.  After about 3 miles, Officer Ross was able to see the vehicle and shortly thereafter got it stopped.  He identified the driver and it was immediately obvious that their high rate of speed with no windshield had an impact on them.  He removed the driver from the vehicle to administer field sobriety tests.  Officer Ross obtained consent to search the drivers person and found 12 Percocet in the drivers pocket.  The driver was unable to produce a valid prescription and was arrested for possession of schedule II narcotic along with unsafe/defective equipment and no state inspection.

Region IV- Mountains, Shenandoah Valley and Northern Piedmont

Angler Admits to Getting Greedy – On March 9, 2017 at approximately 12:15 p.m., CPO Sergeant Carl Martin began surveillance at Hogue Creek while the trout stream was being stocked. As he took notes in the early afternoon, two anglers walked downstream with their dog. They later returned to their vehicle with trout and left the area. Sgt. Martin continued surveillance and then began checking anglers in the evening. At approximately 6:30 p.m., the same fisherman from earlier, returned to his car with a limit of trout (and his dog) and opened the trunk. Sgt. Martin walked towards the angler and asked how he was doing. When the angler turned and saw Sgt. Martin, he immediately slammed the trunk closed. Sgt. Martin observed a Styrofoam cooler, and he asked the angler if he was going to put the trout in it. Sgt. Martin then asked the fisherman if there were trout in the cooler, and he replied ‘yes.’ the Sgt. explained to the fisherman his observations when they were at the stream earlier in the day. The angler, who returned alone and in a different vehicle, opened the cooler to reveal a limit of trout. When asked why the angler returned to the stream and caught a second limit of trout, the fisherman said, “I got greedy.”

CPO Educates Wolf Scouts – On March 21st, Senior CPO Rich Landers met with the Wolf Scouts of Pack 1160’s Den 9 in Reston (Fairfax County).  He discussed his job, training, conservation, and safety in the outdoors.  The Pack’s favorite parts of the presentation were checking out his patrol vehicle and hearing about the various ways he gets to patrol–hiking, biking, boating, and by ATV.  CPO Landers discussed the many ways VDGIF helps to make outdoor sports like hunting and fishing accessible to people with disabilities.  In a part of Virginia where outdoor sports like hunting and fishing aren’t as prevalent as in some other parts of the state, meeting a CPO was a great and very interesting experience for the boys.  Many of them now have plans to become CPOs when they are older.

“We really appreciated CPO Landers making himself available for the scouts, and his ability to make this such a meaningful and engaging presentation”.  Dan Ambrose, Den 9 Leader

Senior Officer Kenneth Williams Awarded NASBLA Boating Officer of the Year for 2016

Senior Officer Williams’ outstanding efforts in boating safety education and boating law enforcement, as well as his dedication to training as a member of the Boating Cadre, were all an integral part of his selection. Williams is assigned to Northumberland County.

“Ken engages in numerous boater education opportunities in and around the northern neck of Virginia, where he uses his expertise to provide instruction and education to the public. His knowledge and understanding of boating laws make him a very effective enforcement officer as well as an instructor and mentor for our new officers,” said Major Scott Naff of DGIF.

Senior Officer Williams has served the boating community in the Virginia’s northern neck since 2006. He conducted 35 on-water boat patrols and 101 boat inspections on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries in a five-county area in 2016. Williams is a certified criminal justice instructor and serves on the agency’s boating training cadre. Officer Williams led his district with 30 boating arrests, 5 of which were alcohol related.

During 2016, Williams also assisted emergency management personnel with inventorying debris and placing hazard markers in the Rappahannock River in the aftermath of a tornado; assisted the Virginia Port Authority when a cargo ship lost a portion of its load in the Chesapeake Bay; and he responded to a distress call in the Coan River that resulted in the rescue of a sailboat operator through rough waters and extreme wind chill.

NASBLA is a national nonprofit organization that works to develop public policy for recreational boating safety.

 

 

Fishin’ Report’

Zain Rahman, age 12 and Dad, Fazal, proudly pose with CITATION 18 3/4 inch brook trout caught on the Rose River at the Graves Mountain Lodge Trout Hertitage Kids Fishing Day.  Photo courtesy Fazal Rahman.
Zain Rahman, age 12 and Dad, Fazal, proudly pose with CITATION 18 3/4 inch brook trout caught on the Rose River at the Graves Mountain Lodge Trout Hertitage Kids Fishing Day. Photo courtesy Fazal Rahman.

The Fishin’ Report is put together from recent reports from avid anglers,  fishing guides, marinas and bait shops for major rivers and lakes all across the state. We encourage you to take advantage of the unusually warm sunny days and head out to your favorite river or lake and take a kid fishing. Please use caution when planning any outdoor activities or going on the water. Always wear your life jacket and let someone know where you are going and when you plan to return. Check conditions before you venture out.

Send your fishing photos directly to us at: david.coffman@dgif.virginia.gov

Citation Brook Trout Caught at Graves Mountain Lodge Trout Heritage Kids Fishing Day April 1st

It was no April Fool’s joke when 12 year old Zain Rehman from Ashburn in Northern Virginia, called out to his Dad, Fazal, “I think I got a big one?!?”  Indeed he did- a citation sized 18 3/4 inch brook trout caught in the Rose River right in front of Graves Mountain Lodge where he was fishing with 200 other youngsters at the annual Trout Heritage Kids Fishing Day. It was an exciting day for Zain as earlier he was thrilled to hold a red corn snake at the DGIf exhibit and learn to use a scratch box turkey call.   The event is co-sponsored by the Rapidan Chapter of Trout Unlimited and DGIF and hosted by the Graves family.  See the TOR feature article for additional photos.

 

Near Record Bowfin Caught in Lake Meade

This 15lb, 8oz Bowfin was caught in Lake Meade in late March by Robert Jones from Northern Virginia.  Meghann Rothgeb, DGIF Fish Citation Coordinator notes that the Bowfin is 1lb shy of the 16lb 8oz State record caught in LAke Cahoon in 2004.   Robert caught the monster on 6lb test line and was fishing for Crappie.  Do you know the difference between the bowfin and the similar looking invasive snakehead?  Visit our Fish ID page  ‘Know the Difference?’ on the DGIF website for tips.

 

Late Winter Trout Stocking Paying Off for Anglers as Spring Arrives

by Allen Easterly, DGIF Complementary Work Force Volunteer

The early March snow storm did not deter the Region 4, West [Shenandoah Valley] Complementary Work Force (CWF) volunteers from their trout stocking routine.  They braved temperatures in the low 20s, with wind speeds to match, bringing the wind chill factor down to the low, single digits.  With a fresh snowfall, they trudged through the white stuff over icy slick rocks and logs, time and time again to bring some beautifully colored Brook Trout to their new home.  Before the stocking crew was finished, a few hard core fishermen were beginning to arrive at streamside to try their luck.  Once a net full of trout hit the cold mountain waters they quickly scattered in all directions.  I’m sure the wily trout spread out nicely so there were nice fish in almost all parts of the stream so every fisherman had an equal opportunity to catch one of these feisty fighters.

Your CWF volunteers are out there for you on every stocking, on every stream, lake and pond, year after year.  As the weather warms, new challenges arise for the stocking crews.  Poison ivy, ticks, chiggers, snakes, rain, and heat are all handled to fill our waterways with nice steelhead and rainbow, brown and brook trout.  Any obstacle we face is well worth the friendship and camaraderie that comes from working together on a common goal.  A streamside lunch together or gathering at a restaurant for breakfast as we wait on the stocking truck is memorable times for all.

This particular stocking crew, who were young, 60-80 year old’s, were all volunteers.  A day of stocking can wear on anyone, so some young muscle would be very welcome.  New volunteers are always welcome.  Contact your regional DGIF office for more information and/or an application.  The next time you see a stocking crew, take a moment to say thanks for the time they devote to giving you a nice day of fishing.  It’s the only compensation we get, and it keeps us coming back.

Hunter Skills Weekend Features Variety of Courses at Holiday Lake May 19-21

Instructor and students work on shotgun skeet shooting skills, rifle marksmanship techniques and safe firearms handling at the Hunter Skills Weekend at the Holiday Lake 4-H Education Center. Photo courtesy Wendy Hyde, VA Hunter Education Association.
Instructor and students work on shotgun skeet shooting skills, rifle marksmanship techniques and safe firearms handling at the Hunter Skills Weekend at the Holiday Lake 4-H Education Center. Photo courtesy Wendy Hyde, VA Hunter Education Association.

Want to learn new hunting skills?  Or hone the ones you have? If so, this workshop is for you! On May 19-21,  Holiday Lake 4-H Educational Center in Appomattox, VA will host the Virginia Hunter Skills Weekend in partnership with the Virginia Hunter Education Association [VHEA] and DGIF.  The group of dedicated instructors will present 19 classes during the 1½ days that include archery, pistol, shotgun, bow hunting, bow fishing, predator hunting, skeet, survival, and upland bird shooting techniques.  Optional evening events include demonstrations and discussions on deer skinning skills and tree stand use and safety.  Participants in the waterfowl workshop can paint a duck decoy to take home.   Organizers see this as a step in the right direction toward preserving Virginia’s rich hunting heritage.

VHEA Wendy Hyde advises that course descriptions and registration information is available on the Holiday Lake 4-H Educational Center web site: www.holidaylake4h.com or by calling Holiday Lake at (434) 248-5444. Information can also be found on the Virginia Hunter Education Association web site: www.vahea.orgRegistration deadline is May 5, 2017.  The event is open to anyone age 11 and up.  Class size is limited so register early!

Feedback from last years event noted,  “This was exactly what I was hoping for as an adult that did not have the luxury of growing up around hunting,” and “As a newcomer to the hunting culture, I have to compliment all of the instructors on their professionalism and enthusiastic approach to teaching all levels.  As the “first line of defense” in engaging a novice, they do an amazing job of increasing interest level and desire to continue learning more.”  And for the entirely-volunteer staff of Hunter Education instructors, that’s exactly what they want to hear. 

King George Outdoor Club Recruits New Hunters at Rose Hill Game Preserve

Eight novice hunters from the King George Outdoor Club were hosted by the Rose Hill Game Preserve and sponsored by the Rappahannock Spurs Chapter of NWTF and WITO Coordinator and volunteer Hunter Education Instructor, Julie Abel.  Mark Fike, Hunter Education Instructor led the group with hands on experience shooting clays and safe gun handling, then live field pheasant hunting with amazing bird dogs  and handlers. The teens cleaned their harvest and were treated to venison for lunch.
Eight novice hunters from the King George Outdoor Club were hosted by the Rose Hill Game Preserve and sponsored by the Rappahannock Spurs Chapter of NWTF and WITO Coordinator and volunteer Hunter Education Instructor, Julie Abel. Mark Fike, Hunter Education Instructor led the group with hands on experience shooting clays and safe gun handling, then live field pheasant hunting with amazing bird dogs and handlers. The teens cleaned their harvest and were treated to venison for lunch. "An awesome day afield!", exclaimed one of the young hunters, now eagar to go again. Photo courtesy Mark Fike.

Mark Fike is a freelance outdoor writer and photographer. Mark writes for Virginia Game and Fish regularly and has been published in Virginia Wildlife, Whitetail Times, Turkey Country, and many other publications.  He is also a volunteer DGIF Hunter Education Instructor and school teacher in King George where he mentors a student Outdoor Club.

Pheasant Hunt Provides Safe Shooting Skills Experience for Novice Hunters

March 4th dawned crispy cold as I headed my truck in the direction of what turned out to be a successful youth hunt. After picking up a few youth and a parent, we headed out towards Rose Hill Game Preserve to expose eight youth to our tradition of hunting. Most had never hunted before and the few that had, did so in the past few months. All went through a few prerequisites to include taking the VDGIF Hunters Education Course. Each of the youth were selected based on their maturity and desire to learn to hunt. As readers can imagine, taking 8 youth on a hunting trip where there are a lot of moving parts- such as dogs pointing birds, other humans moving around nearby and a flying bird, is a big undertaking. This was not a trip to take just any newbie on. After completing the hunter ed course and being selected to “try out” for the hunt, the youth then had to prove they could safely handle a shotgun and hit moving targets. We threw clays for the youth over the course of several practices for those that needed it. Several of our youth were true naturals and hit clays right away. One even was breaking clays with a Remington semiautomatic .410! Another is on the 4-H Shotgun team but had never hunted. Then, we had a few young ladies that had never shot moving targets before. One of our young women was found to be right handed and left eye dominant. I would think we had a few challenges to overcome but the youth turned that idea upside down. The young lady with the eye dominance challenge was instructed how to hold the shotgun left handed, her stance was set up and three clays later orange pieces were littering the ground! One of the other young ladies carefully listened to what I had to say about shooting clays and in less fingers than I have on one hand, her clays were flying apart. You have to love young people that listen carefully and execute the directions like that! I had two “dueling shooters,” as I started referring to them, that asked for two clays to be thrown at once at one of our practices. Both lined up next to each other and much to my amazement, they waited until the clays crossed paths close enough to be taken with one shot. Both girls waited for that moment and then tried to be the first one to break the clays. I have to say, pride surged in my chest. The youth were amazing! We worked with the others until they were hitting clays and then offered additional practices for those that needed it. The youth invested a lot of time in preparing for their hunting opportunity.  Read the rest of the story and view the gallery of photos at:  http://fikeoutdoors.com/blog.html

Lee County Strutters 5th Youth Turkey Hunt A Big Success

Nine youngsters participated in the 5th Lee County Strutters NWTF Youth Turkey Hunt during the Youth and Apprentice Spring Turkey Hunt weekend.  Each hunter was accompanied by adult mentors to provide direction and monitor safety on the various public and private properties hunted in Lee County.  The event has received Best Repeat JAKES Event  awards from NWTF and this year received a grant from the Virginia Wildlife eStore .
Nine youngsters participated in the 5th Lee County Strutters NWTF Youth Turkey Hunt during the Youth and Apprentice Spring Turkey Hunt weekend. Each hunter was accompanied by adult mentors to provide direction and monitor safety on the various public and private properties hunted in Lee County. The event has received Best Repeat JAKES Event awards from NWTF and this year received a grant from the Virginia Wildlife eStore .

On April 1, 2017, the Lee County Strutters chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation (NWTF) held its 5th Annual Youth Turkey Hunt.  This program is supported by the 2016 Virginia Wildlife eStore (www.ShopDGIF.com) Grant Program through a partnership between the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and the Wildlife Foundation of Virginia.  The event was also sponsored by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Daniel Boone Soil and Water Conservation District, Liberty Sport and Pawn and Bass Pro Shops.

The youth participants gathered on the afternoon of March 26, 2017 for a pre-hunt meeting to pattern their shotguns and receive information regarding the upcoming hunt. Nine youngsters participated in this year’s event and each hunter was accompanied by adult mentors to provide direction and monitor safety on the various public and private properties located in Lee County.

The hunters gathered very early in the morning on the opening day of Youth/Apprentice Spring Turkey Weekend.  Several of the participants had encounters with turkeys in the field and all enjoyed the sounds of gobbling and anticipation of a gobbler coming in.  Three of the youth were able to successfully harvest a wild turkey during the hunt.

Each youth hunter received a camouflage hat, diaphragm turkey calls and a commemorative 2017 Virginia NWTF Jakes Turkey Hunt box call.  To conclude the event, everyone enjoyed lunch provided by the Lee County Strutters.

Tosh Barnette, JAKES event coordinator and former DGIF CPO,  proudly noted that this event had received the  2016  and 2015 Virginia State Chapter NWTF  “Best Repeat JAKES  Save the Hunt Event” for the Youth Spring Turkey Hunt. The Chapter also recieved recognition for their  JAKES Event in September.  Tosh acknowledged that the support of the Virginia Wildlife eStore grant allowed the Chapter to expand the event to include more young novice hunters and pass on our treasured hunting heritage and traditions important to the culture of Southwest Virginia.

Record Number of Gobblers Harvested During Youth and Apprentice Spring Turkey Hunting Weekend

Youth and novice hunters reported killing a record 624 bearded turkeys during the special Saturday and Sunday Youth and Apprentice Spring Turkey Hunting weekend, a 4 percent increase over the 2016 total of 598.   On Saturday 69% (433) of the turkeys were reported killed and 31 % (191) on Sunday.

The opening of the regular spring gobbler season wekend April 8-9 was also successful for many turkey hunters.  In contrast to the snow and cold windy conditions last year, last weekends opening showed a dramatic increase in both Saturday and Sunday harvests.

Spring Gobbler Opening Weekend 2017

Saturday, April 8th             2,019

Sunday, April 9th                1,028    

Weekend Total                 3,047

Spring Gobbler Opening Weekend 2016

Saturday, April 9th             1,610

Sunday, April 10th                  681

Weekend Total                 2,291

Share your photos of the fun and excitement of smiling young hunters during the spring youth gobbler hunting weekend April 1-2 with The Outdoor Report and other websites.   There are three opportunities to share your photos of smiling young hunters with their trophy gobblers and possibly win some great prizes..

The Star City Whitetails Hunting website is sponsoring the Spring Gobbler  4th Annual Best Photo Contest 2017.  Jeff Phillips  website founder, invites youth and adult hunters throughout the spring season to simply send in the BEST PICTURE of you and your spring gobbler to jeff@starcitywhitetails or to Whitetails Facebook page and you will be in the running for a great group of prizes.  Visit the SCWT website photo contest page for details and list of prizes.

Remember Safety First!  Because turkeys have both keen hearing and sharp eyesight, camouflage is worn by hunters. It is essential for every hunter to positively identify their target and the area beyond their target, before pulling the trigger. Most hunting fatalities are the result of the hunter not making sure of his or her target. Be safe and have fun!

 

Virginia Outdoor Lovers Weekend in Radford April 22

The Virginia Outdoor Lovers Expo on April 22, 2017 will be a weekend full of outdoor adventure! With FREE events for the novice nature-lover, to the more advanced folks who are looking for that next adrenaline rush, this expo handles all of that. The Expo will have live music, beer, raffle tickets, giveaways, and more. The event will be held in Radford’s Bisset Park on the banks of the New River from 10am- 4pm.  This third annual event raises awareness of the diverse outdoor recreation opportunities that are abundant across Southwest Virginia.  DGIF Regional Fisheries Manager, Bill Kittrell, invites participants to visit the Agencies exhibit to learn about the many opportunities to enjoy hunting, fishing, boating and wildlife viewing in the Southwest region. Spend the first day learning about new destinations to hike, bike, kayak, rock climb, or try something new with the many other activities the region provides. Local businesses, clubs, outdoor organizations, and others will be on hand to share information to get you out on your next outdoor adventure.

Want more? Book an off-site trip to explore somewhere new with your family or friends by joining a guided excursion.  Appalachian Spring, a 19-county, Southwest Virginia community and economic development regional initiative, sponsors the event which has more than 80 vendors and demonstrations from throughout the region.

For more information visit their website: http://www.swvaoutdoorexpo.com/

See Spectacular Display of Wildflowers at Merrimac Farms WMA April 9

The Bluebell Festival at Merrimac Farms on April 9th offers a spectacular display of Virginia Bluebells that carpet the floodplain along Cedar Run for nearly a mile. This is also a wonderful opportunity to learn more about Merrimac Farm Wildlife Management Area, meet local environmental organizations and the people who are working to improve our community.

A series of naturalist led tours will follow an easy one-mile walk through the floodplain from 10 am-4 pm. Each tour has a special focus; although leaders cover all interesting sights. Local organizations will share displays and activities for children of all ages. Check online at pwconserve.org for the tour schedule and a list of participating organizations.

A bake sale and a hand-painted rain barrel raffle to benefit stewardship projects at Merrimac Farm round out the event. Concessions and food will be available for purchase. Bring binoculars, cameras, the kids, and come out to join us for a day of fun!

Sponsored by VA Dept. of Game & Inland Fisheries and Prince William Conservation Alliance with support from Marine Corps Base Quantico.  For more information, check online at www.pwconserve.org or contact Prince William Conservation Alliance at 703.499.4954, alliance@pwconserve.org, pwconserve.org

2017 Spring Gobbler Outlook

“Spring turkey hunters should enjoy quality spring gobbler hunting in 2017 throughout the Commonwealth,” according to Gary Norman, DGIF Wild Turkey Project Leader.

“The Spring Gobbler Survey report for the 2016 season gives our best forecast for the upcoming season. I don’t expect a significant change in the upcoming season harvest levels. As always, weather is a critical issue, namely weekend weather in the first 2-3 weekends,” Norman added.

 The Department’s Brood Surveys suggests reproduction has been average over the past 4 years.  Under these conditions populations are expected to remain stable.  Given that turkeys are believed to be at record levels for the Commonwealth, stable is desirable.

Norman says one negative issue is that turkeys are not uniformly spread across our landscape. Stable but low population levels are red flags that the Department is addressing with shorter fall seasons.  Unfortunately, we have not seen above-average recruitment in these problem areas for many years.

“The unseasonable warm weather in February has accelerated the signs of spring, including gobbling.  Some hunters have expressed concern that we will miss peak gobbling times this spring. My thinking on this concern is that March weather generally has more impact than February on the chronology of mating, egg-laying, incubation, and hatching, and it’s presumptive to think March will be as warm as February.  However, we can expect some early springs and 2017 may turn out to eventually be one,” said Norman.

While an early spring can accelerate reproduction, such conditions only move the timetable up by 10-14 days. Day-length is more critical to these biological processes than warmer temperatures.

“Starting hunting closer to nest incubation will improve, not detract from hunter success rates.  Currently, we start spring hunting at the peak of egg-laying (mid-April).  A 2-week advance in reproduction would start our season when most hens are on the nest and under these conditions; gobblers are typically more responsive to calling.  Our long (5-week, 6 weekends) season should capture this peak gobbling period.  If there is any impact, I expect to see it at the end of the 2017 spring season,” according to Norman.

“Finally, a mentor of mine, Mr. Jim Pack, retired Turkey Biologist for the WV DNR would always qualify his gobbler season forecast by saying “Good gobbling requires good weather”.  You may have seen me use that line before.  That’s definitely difficult to forecast but ever so true.  I would like to thank everyone that contributed to this survey and I hope you find it interesting reading. Best wishes to you for a safe and enjoyable spring season.”

The 2016 SGS Results and 2017 Survey can be found on the DGIF website.

Looking for great spring gobbler hunting opportunities? Read our Wildlife Management Area report »

Bear Hunters Hold Spring Field Trial March 25th

At the  Virginia Bear Hunters’ Assoc. Spring Field Trial in Botetourt County March 25, a scented, mechanical bear is used for baying and treeing events and a drag race. A youth competition is featured this year.  Photo courtesy David Steger, Past President VA Bear Hunters Association.
At the Virginia Bear Hunters’ Assoc. Spring Field Trial in Botetourt County March 25, a scented, mechanical bear is used for baying and treeing events and a drag race. A youth competition is featured this year. Photo courtesy David Steger, Past President VA Bear Hunters Association.

The Virginia Bear Hunters Association will hold their annual Spring Field Trial on March 25th, 2017 in Botetourt County and start time is 10:00 A.M.  Food will be available and dog supplies will also be sold.  VABHA President Richard Sprinkle invites all interested bear hunters to come join in the fun and excitement of this spring ritual.  The event uses a scented moving mechanical bear  for the baying  contests.  The dash race and treeing events use a scented hide in combination with a mounted bear. Trophies are awarded for First, Second, and Third place in each event.  Dogs entered in each of the three single dog events will compete for the Top Bear Dog of the event. There will also be a youth bear baying contest held with the top five youth/dog competitors receiving trophies.  Driving directions are : From Buchanan take Rt. 43 West for seven miles; From Eagle Rock take Rt. 43 East for seven miles and watch for signs. Visit their website at http://www.virginiabearhunters.org/ for more information or call Richard Sprinkle at 540-254-2578.

Virginia Conservation Police Notebook

To increase awareness of the activities of our dedicated Conservation Police Officers (CPO), previously called game wardens, the “Virginia Conservation Police Notebook” provides an overview of the variety of activities encountered by our officers who protect natural resources and people pursuing outdoor recreation in the fields, woods and waters of Virginia. These reports are prepared from the officer’s actual field notes by Kim McCarthy, Executive Assistant to Major Scott Naff [Operations] and Major Bryan Young [Administration] of the Law Enforcement Division VDGIF. These CPO reports show the value of concerned citizens, landowners and true sportsmen in providing tips to law enforcement officers on suspected violations by lawbreakers who give other outdoor enthusiasts an undeserved bad reputation. Don’t let the actions of a few outlaws tarnish the reputation of Virginia’s sportsmen!

Region I – Tidewater

Assisting Sheriff’s Office – On February 28, 2017, CPO Glenn Cramer was on patrol in King George County, when a call was put out by the Sheriff’s office regarding a breaking and entering in progress. Cramer was close to the location and responded. He was requested by the Deputy Supervisor to stage in the driveway. Cramer and another deputy were quickly first on scene. They made contact with the victim in her home who advised them she had heard a noise in her basement and went to check on it when she was confronted by a male suspect. The suspect fled the home. When the Sheriff’s K9 unit arrived on scene, Cramer accompanied the K9 unit providing security. The suspect’s foot tracks led to a field area where he apparently left by vehicle based on the tire tracks. The incident is under investigation by the Sheriff’s Office.

DGIF CPO’s Participate in Search and Rescue Training – The 11th Annual Steven Todd Dooley Search and Rescue Forum was held February 27- March 3. This training is sponsored by the Port of Virginia and the United States Coast Guard. It had 147 participants representing 32 federal, state and local agencies.  The Port of Virginia says this year’s event was the largest it has ever had. This week long training had evolutions that encompassed many aspects of search and rescue operations. Boat crews had the opportunity to hone their skills in the areas of small boat handling, oil spill boom deployment, sonar operations, and search patterns. DGIF had eight officers participate in this year’s training. These officers utilized 27’ patrol boats from District’s 12 and 13. These patrol boats are outfitted with upgraded electronics packages. These vessels allow our CPO’s to effectively operate along Virginia’s coast at any time, day or night. The boat crews use the on-board sonar capabilities to locate underwater objects, and FLIR imaging to see in the dark. Norfolk Fire Battalion Chief Worley and CPO Murray facilitated the first responder breakout session. They and their guest instructor discussed radiation detection and interagency coordination.  CPO Murray also presented the 2016 Boat Incident Statistics to the group.

Honesty; The Potential Difference Between a Warning and a Summons – At the conclusion of the 2016-2017 deer hunting season, CPO Cameron Dobyns spent some time looking through the agency’s deer harvest information data related to Essex County. He detected several people with potential violations. He contacted the individuals and inquired into their hunting activities on specific days based on information in the database. One subject was interviewed and quickly admitted he knew he had made a mistake. He was given a written warning for killing an antlerless deer on a non either sex day. Dobyns met with another suspect on March 05, 2017, who admitted to a buck and doe he killed, but attempted to claim he killed the doe in Westmoreland County instead of Essex County. When Dobyns showed him in the game law digest that Westmoreland also was not an either sex day on November 25, 2016, the suspect admitted to killing a doe and a buck in Essex on a day that was not legal to harvest doe deer. A magistrate summons was obtained and the suspect was charged for killing an antlerless deer on a non-either sex day.

Westmoreland County Blind Patrol – On Sunday, March 12, 2017, Sergeant Rich Goszka and CPO Dan Rabago conducted a patrol in Westmoreland County targeting abandon stationary waterfowl blinds and offshore blind stake license. The officers detected three violations of the offshore blind stake laws for further investigation.

Region IV –  Mountains & Shenandoah Valley and Northern Piedmont

Too Much Time on the Phone – While working trout enforcement on Saturday, March 4th, Sergeant Carl Martin checked an angler on the Delayed Harvest Section of Passage Creek. The fisherman carried in a plastic bag a trout with the artificial lure still in its mouth. He explained he kept the fish since it swallowed the hook. He checked his phone for a copy of his fishing license, but didn’t find it. After walking back to the vehicle, the angler said he had a fishing license and kept “looking” for it on the phone. After considerable phone time by the fisherman, Sgt. Martin asked for his ID and contacted the VDGIF Dispatch to request a fishing license check. While checking, Dispatcher Ashley Durr could tell the angler was actually purchasing his licenses as we spoke on the phone! Upon being told of this “real time” purchase, Sgt. Martin made the appropriate charges.